A Functional Understanding of Human Rehabilitation

Course Description

This course provides a broad overview and practical application of contemporary pain science, movement science, manual therapy, communication, and behavior change utilizing a biopsychosocial process-based framework called the Human Framework Rehabilitation (HRF). The HRF is presented as transdiagnostic alternative to diagnosis classification and protocol for movement and rehabilitation specialists. This course work is a blend of lecture, lab, and case studies to maximize clinical application.

Course Background

The study of movement and pain has undergone significant changes in the last four decades as increased effort to move healthcare from a biomedical to biopsychosocial approach for care. The Human Rehabilitation Framework (HRF) is the world’s first biopsychosocial process-based approach to rehabilitation, accessible by all disciplines to deliver care in a transdisciplinary manner. It addresses the criticisms of the Biopsychosocial (BPS) Model and is an evolutionary step forward for Evidence-Based Practice (EBP), providing a new perspective that synthesizes scientific evidence, clinical practice, and personalized care. The HRF is based on the scientific philosophy of Functional Contextualism and replaces differential diagnosis, Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs), and Clinical Pathways with a process-based approach for evaluation and intervention. It supports advances in personalized precision medicine and the value-based care model and is designed to be ready for the future of biomedicine and biopsychosocial research.

Course Target Audience: Physical Therapists, Athletic Trainers, Occupational Therapists, Chiropractors, Physical and Occupational Therapist Assistants, Massage Therapists, Counselors/Social Workers, Nurses/Nurse Practitioners, Osteopaths, Physicians, Rehabilitation Professional Students

Course Objectives

  1. To introduce the Human Rehabilitation Framework (HRF) as a biopsychosocial process-based treatment approach for rehabilitation.
  2. To provide an overview of current science-based knowledge related to pain science, movement, and manual therapy.
    Identify the nine biopsychosocial flexibility/inflexibility processes associated with the HRF.
  3. To discuss how the HRF integrates into the Extended Evolutionary Meta Model (EEMM) as it relates to the concepts facilitating behavior change which can be translated to patients as well as across different disciplines.
  4. Discuss the importance of viewing movement and posture within a functional contextualism perspective.
  5. Summarize the three categories of HRF biopsychosocial processes you can immediately implement in your clinical practice.

Meet Your Instructor

Leonard Van Gelder

Leonard Van Gelder is a clinician, coach, researcher, & educator. He is one of the co-founders of, and serves in leadership roles for, the Institute of Contextual Health.

He has been involved in the movement and rehabilitation field for over 20 years. During this time, he has studied, published research, and presented at regional and international conferences on the science of movement and pain. He has explored a diverse spectrum of manual therapy and movement approaches, and emphasizes a biopsychosocial approach to movement, manual therapy, and education in his practice.

Leonard had a previous career in information technology and has a previous history in martial arts including working stunt and action choreography. He enjoys spending time with his wife, occasional traveling, and creative outlets such as film/video production.

Focus on Psychological Flexibility Skills for the Human Rehabilitation Framework

Course Description

This course provides a broad overview and practical application of contemporary pain science, movement science, manual therapy, communication, and behavior change utilizing a biopsychosocial process-based framework called the Human Framework Rehabilitation (HRF). The HRF is presented as transdiagnostic alternative to diagnosis classification and protocol for movement and rehabilitation specialists. This course work is a blend of lecture, lab, and case studies to maximize clinical application.

Course Background

The study of movement and pain has undergone significant changes in the last four decades as increased effort to move healthcare from a biomedical to biopsychosocial approach for care. The Human Rehabilitation Framework (HRF) is the world’s first biopsychosocial process-based approach to rehabilitation, accessible by all disciplines to deliver care in a transdisciplinary manner. It addresses the criticisms of the Biopsychosocial (BPS) Model and is an evolutionary step forward for Evidence-Based Practice (EBP), providing a new perspective that synthesizes scientific evidence, clinical practice, and personalized care. The HRF is based on the scientific philosophy of Functional Contextualism and replaces differential diagnosis, Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs), and Clinical Pathways with a process-based approach for evaluation and intervention. It supports advances in personalized precision medicine and the value-based care model and is designed to be ready for the future of biomedicine and biopsychosocial research.

Course Target Audience: Physical Therapists, Athletic Trainers, Occupational Therapists, Chiropractors, Physical and Occupational Therapist Assistants, Massage Therapists, Counselors/Social Workers, Nurses/Nurse Practitioners, Osteopaths, Physicians, Rehabilitation Professional Students

Course Objectives

  1. To introduce the Human Rehabilitation Framework (HRF) as a biopsychosocial process-based treatment approach for rehabilitation.
  2. To provide an overview of current science-based knowledge related to pain science, movement, and manual therapy.
    Identify the nine biopsychosocial flexibility/inflexibility processes associated with the HRF.
  3. To discuss how the HRF integrates into the Extended Evolutionary Meta Model (EEMM) as it relates to the concepts facilitating behavior change which can be translated to patients as well as across different disciplines.
  4. Discuss the importance of viewing movement and posture within a functional contextualism perspective.
  5. Summarize the three categories of HRF biopsychosocial processes you can immediately implement in your clinical practice.

Meet Your Instructor

Leonard Van Gelder

Leonard Van Gelder is a clinician, coach, researcher, & educator. He is one of the co-founders of, and serves in leadership roles for, the Institute of Contextual Health.

He has been involved in the movement and rehabilitation field for over 20 years. During this time, he has studied, published research, and presented at regional and international conferences on the science of movement and pain. He has explored a diverse spectrum of manual therapy and movement approaches, and emphasizes a biopsychosocial approach to movement, manual therapy, and education in his practice.

Leonard had a previous career in information technology and has a previous history in martial arts including working stunt and action choreography. He enjoys spending time with his wife, occasional traveling, and creative outlets such as film/video production.